Biblical exegesis

Ten Steps for Exegesis Part 1 Review and Introduction We are continuing our study of hermeneutics, introduction to Biblical interpretation. We will review briefly where we have been over the course of these sessions.

Biblical exegesis

Biblical exegesis

Who is the author of the work? Is the attributed author the actual author, or is the work pseudepigraphic? When, where, and under what circumstances was the work written? Who were the original recipients? Where did they live? Traditional Literary Criticism What Biblical exegesis are used, and what range of meanings do they have?

What images and symbols are used, and what do they signify? What characters appear in the story? What do we know about them?

How are the characters related to one another in the story?

Nature and significance

Comparison of Translations Are there any significant differences between various modern translations? When were these translations done, using which translation philosophies? Which ancient Hebrew or Greek texts underlie the various translations?

Has anything been lost or obscured in the process of translation? Textual Criticism Are there any variant readings in the ancient manuscripts?

Are the variants negligible mere spelling or significant affecting meaning? Can the variants be explained as intentional changes, or as accidental ones? How do the literary or historical contexts help explain the variant readings? Source Criticism Does the text have any underlying source or sources?

Which version of a source was used, in case there is more than one? What do the sources actually say and mean in their original contexts? How are the sources used quoted, paraphrased, adapted?

Does the text follow or diverge from the usual expectations for this genre? In what social context would texts of this genre have been used?

Redaction Criticism How has the author used the source s in shaping this text? What particular views or theological emphases does this author show?

Biblical exegesis

Socio-Historical Criticism If the story claims to be historical, what really happened? What social, historical, or cultural information can be gleaned from the text?

What background information is necessary to better understand the text? What was life like for the common people, not just the ruling elites? What message is the author trying to convey?

Exegesis | biblical interpretation | benjaminpohle.com

Is the author attempting to instruct, inspire, defend, or persuade the reader? What rhetorical techniques does he use to achieve his goals? Narrative Analysis Who are the characters in the story?

What roles do they play? What is the plot sequence? What narrative time is covered?A Biblically based commentary on current issues that impact you. Apostles and Prophets and the Foundation of the Church Bibilical Exegesis that Proves that . BibleWorks--Software for Exegesis and Research.

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Other types of exegetical critical techniques

Biblical criticism is an umbrella term for those methods of studying the Bible that embrace two distinctive perspectives: the concern to avoid dogma and bias by applying a non-sectarian, reason-based judgment, and the reconstruction of history according to contemporary benjaminpohle.comal criticism uses the grammar, structure, development, and relationship of language to identify such.

Guide for Writing an Exegesis On a Biblical Passage A. Initial Approach 1. Context. Locate your pericope both within the immediate context of the basic division of the book. Exegesis: Exegesis, the critical interpretation of the biblical text to discover its intended meaning.

Both Jews and Christians have used various exegetical methods throughout their history, and doctrinal and polemical intentions have often influenced interpretive results; a given text may yield a number of. Exegesis: Exegesis, the critical interpretation of the biblical text to discover its intended meaning.

Both Jews and Christians have used various exegetical methods throughout their history, and doctrinal and polemical intentions have often influenced interpretive results; a given text may yield a number of.

Exegesis - Wikipedia