An introduction to the history of geisha

April 20, May 23, Geisha are an icon of Japanese culture. Mystique and stigma surrounds the profession. Being a geisha is a profession, just as librarianship is a profession.

An introduction to the history of geisha

The most literal translation of geisha into English would be "artist", "performing artist", or "artisan". This term is used to refer to geisha from Western Japan, which includes Kyoto and Kanazawa. The white make-up and elaborate kimono and hair of a maiko is the popular image held of geisha.

A woman entering the geisha community does not have to begin as a maiko, having the opportunity to begin her career as a full geisha.

Either way, however, usually a year's training is involved before debuting either as a maiko or as a geisha. A woman above 21 is considered too old to be a maiko and becomes a full geisha upon her initiation into the geisha community.

On average, Tokyo apprentices who typically begin at 18 are slightly older than their Kyoto counterparts who usually start at The early Shikomi in-training and Minarai learns by watching stages of geisha training lasted for years shikomi and months minarai respectively, which is significantly longer than in contemporary times.

A girl is often a shikomi for up to a year while the modern minarai period is simply one month. Before they disappearedthe courtesans were the colourful "flowers" and the geisha the " willows " because of their subtlety, strength, and grace. Saburuko serving girls were mostly wandering girls whose families were displaced from struggles in the late s.

Some of these saburuko girls sold sexual services, while others with a better education made a living by entertaining at high-class social gatherings. Traditional Japan embraced sexual delights it is not a Shinto taboo and men were not constrained to be faithful to their wives.

For sexual enjoyment and romantic attachment, men did not go to their wives, but to courtesans. They performed erotic dances and skits, and this new art was dubbed kabuku, meaning "to be wild and outrageous".

The dances were called "kabuki", and this was the beginning of kabuki theater. The highly accomplished courtesans of these districts entertained their clients by dancing, singing, and playing music.

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Some were renowned poets and calligraphers. Gradually, they all became specialized and the new profession, purely of entertainment, arose. It was near the turn of the eighteenth century that the first entertainers of the pleasure quarters, called geisha, appeared.

The first geishas were men, entertaining customers waiting to see the most popular and gifted courtesans oiran. In the s, they were popular paid entertainers in the private homes of upper-class samurai, [11] though many had turned to prostitution by the early 18th century.

Those who were no longer teenagers and could no longer style themselves odoriko [12] adopted other names—one being "geisha", after the male entertainers. The first woman known to have called herself geisha was a Fukagawa prostitute, in about While licensed courtesans existed to meet men's sexual needs, machi geisha carved out a separate niche as artists and erudite female companions.

Bybeing a geisha was considered a female occupation though there are still a handful of male geisha working today. Eventually, the gaudy Oiran began to fall out of fashion, becoming less popular than the chic " iki " and modern geisha.The first geisha were male entertainers, serving guests with music, lighthearted conversation, and comical play.

Tokebei Yamada, Japanese Dolls, Japan Travel Bureau (). A lively little book with information not only on the history of the dolls but on 's doll production. A lively little book with information not only on the history of the dolls but on 's doll production. The geisha kimono requires a different way of walking, according to Liza Dalby. Dalby is one of the few Westerners who have become geisha. She says that over time, geisha bodies become adapted to . Oct 02,  · This video has an introduction about the history of Geisha by Lecturer in Japanese History Suzanne Perrin, followed by images of Geisha and .

The first female geisha appeared around They quickly outnumbered their male counterparts, and by the word geisha was mainly applied to women. Geisha have a formal kimono (called de) that shows off the nap of her neck. This is the kimono that demands the elaborate hair styles and the white makeup.

This is the kimono that demands the elaborate hair styles and the white makeup. Home Essays History Geisha. History Geisha. Topics: Geisha INTRODUCTION Japan or it is also known as Nihon or Nippon.

Japan is an island nation in East Asia. It is located in the Pacific Ocean, it lies to the east of the Sea of Japan, China, North Korea, South Korea and Russia, stretching from the Sea of Okhotsk in the north to the. Geisha are an icon of Japanese culture.

Mystique and stigma surrounds the profession. Being a geisha is a profession, just as librarianship is a profession. Geisha are not prostitutes.

An introduction to the history of geisha

Although, prostitution has marred the profession. This paper discusses the history of the geisha from its beginning form and what has affected the geisha to change during the years up to its decline.

From to , the geisha slowly lost their fashion status due to the introduction of Western style clothing. What used to be geisha was no more. Japan is known for its very good and very beautiful entertainers called geisha. Geisha in Japanese means “artist.

An introduction to the history of geisha

The history of geisha began during the 11th century when two women created a new kind of dance to entertain warriors.

Geisha - Wikipedia